Contradictions Part – 2

7. Removing All Prejudice or Saying Non-Baha’is Are like Dry Wood That Are Only Worthy of Fire?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: We act to remove prejudice but others just talk.

“To reach the goal of (removing prejudice) we strive . . . but others just talk,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 99.

Bahā’u’llāh: Non-Baha’is are like dry wood that are only worthy of fire.

“Anyone who has a garden will not allow the dry trees to remain in the garden and will definitely cut them and throw them in fire, for dry wood is only worthy of fire. Thus, O inhabitants of my orchard, protect yourselves from the wicked poisonous breath and void breeze which is socializing with the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism) and the unaware (ghāfil),”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 8, p. 39.

 

8. Removing Prejudice or Depriving of All Graces, Those Who View Non-Baha’is as Humans?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: People must not regard themselves superior to others.

“One of Bahā’u’llāh’s teachings is mutual aid between humans. This aid is much greater than equality. It means that not only one must not see himself superior to others; rather, he must sacrifice his life and belongings for other people,”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt), vol. 3, p. 107.

Bahā’u’llāh: Whoever call my deniers humans, will be deprived of all of God’s graces.

“From this day, any individual that mentions as human a single person from those who deny me—whether that [denier] has a high or low stature—they will be excluded from all of (God’s) Merciful Graces, let alone trying to prove [those deniers] have dignity or stature,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 140.

 

9. Removing Racial Prejudice or Calling All Black Africans Irrational Savages?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Prejudice destroys the foundations of humanity.

“The fifth Baha’i principle is that sexual prejudice, religious prejudice, spiritual prejudice, national prejudice, and political prejudice are the destroyers of human foundations,”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Khaṭābāt (Tehran), vol. 2, p. 147.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: The inhabitants of a land like Africa are all like wild savages and land-dwelling animals that lack common-sense and knowledge.

“The inhabitants of a land like Africa are all like wild savages and land-dwelling animals that lack common-sense and knowledge and are all wild. There is not a single wise and civilized person among them,”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt), vol. 1, pp. 331.

“The wild tribes have no superiority over animals. For example what is the difference between African blacks and American blacks? The [black Africans] are cows that God has created with human faces. The [black Americans] are civilized, intelligent, and have culture . . .”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Khaṭābāt (Tehran), vol. 3, p. 48.

 

10. Having No Prejudice or Saying Turks Deserve Ridiculous Answers?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: “In the presence of God there is no [such thing] as English, French, Turk, or Persian. To God they are all the same.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 45-46.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Turks deserve ridiculous answers.

“When Djemal Pasha. . . reached Acre and asked to see me, I mounted a donkey and headed for his home. As soon as he saw me, he greeted me and sat me next to him and without hesitation said: “You are a corrupter of religion and that is why the government of Iran exiled you here . . .” I thought to myself that he is a Turk and I must give him a ridiculous and silencing answer,”

Reference: Asad-Allāh Fāḍil Māzandarānī, Asrār al-āthār khuṣūṣī,vol. 3,p. 42–43.

 

11. Removing All Prejudice or Discrimination between Men and Women?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: All people have equal rights.

“There is equality between people and complete brotherhood. Justice implies that the rights of humankind be protected and preserved and all have equal rights,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 30.

Bahā’u’llāh and `Abdu’l-Bahā: Women are inferior to men, they take a smaller share of inheritance, and cannot be a member of the UHJ.

“A woman’s question was referred to him who had asked why hasn’t God made any woman Prophets and why have all Divine Manifestations been men. He answered: ‘Although women and men share the same capacities and abilities, there is definitely no doubt that men are superior and stronger. Even in animals like pigeons, sparrows, peacocks, and other [birds] this advantage is visible,’”

Reference: Maḥmūd Zaraqānī, Badā’i` al-āthār, vol. 1, p. 153.

“The deceased’s property are split into 2520 portions. Out of these, 1080 are for the children, 390 for the wives, fathers 330, mothers 270, brothers 210, sisters 150, teachers 90”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 10, p. 117–119.

Women cannot be a member of UHJ

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 27, p. 219.

 

A Summary and Conclusion

1) Is Removing All Prejudice a new principle?

The extreme form of removing all kinds of prejudice brought forward by Bahā’u’llāh is novel to an extent but nevertheless incorrect and unacceptable.

2) Did the leaders of Baha’ism act upon this principle?

There are numerous documented instances where Baha’i leaders have expressed, religious, racial, and sexual prejudice. This shows that those who created this principle didn’t adhere to it themselves.

3) Is this principle rational and logical?

No rational person will accept that all kinds of prejudice and zeal must be removed. In other religions, this fact has been explained by pointing out that having prejudice on what is right and favorable is not only good but also defendable.

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

Contradictions

Bahā’u’llāh:
“Contradiction has and will not ever have a way in the sanctified realm of the Divine Manifestations.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 126.

1. Removing All Prejudice or Prohibition of Meeting with Non-Baha’is

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Have no prejudice and show no hatred towards any religion.

“Keep aloof from the scent of ignorant prejudice, enmity, vulgar hatred, and sexual, national and religious delusions, for they are all against God’s religion and His satisfaction and will deprive mankind of God’s graces . . . do not have the slightest hatred towards anyone from any nation, religion, tribe, sex, or land, rather show utmost compassion and friendship,”

Reference: Riyāḍ Qadīmī, Gulzār-i ta`ālim Bahā’ī, pp. 366–367.

Bahā’u’llāh and `Abdu’l-Bahā: Keep away from non-Baha’is and do not socialize with them.

“Do not socialize with those who deny God (meaning non-Baha’is) and his signs and keep away from their kind,”

Reference:`Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 8, p. 39.

“In it incumbent on ever soul to keep away from the wicked breath of the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism),”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 8, p. 39.

“Know that God has forbidden his friends from meeting with the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism) and hypocrites,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 4, p. 280. for more quotes refer to chapter 2.

 

2. Having No Prejudice or Considering All Non-Baha’is Ignorant and Unreasonable?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Religious prejudice destroys the foundations of humanity.

“The fifth Baha’i principle is that sexual prejudice, religious prejudice, spiritual prejudice, national prejudice, and political prejudice are the destroyers of human foundations,”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Khaṭābāt (Tehran), vol. 2, p. 147.

Bahā’u’llāh: Only Baha’is are knowledgeable and reasonable and non-Baha’is are ignorant and lack reason.

“From now on nobody is to be called knowledgeable, except those who have decorated themselves with the garment of this New Affair (meaning those who have become Baha’is),”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 138–139.

“If today, someone grasps all of the knowledge on earth but stops at the word ‘yes’ (meaning does not become a Baha’i), the Lord will not pay attention to him and he will be considered as the most ignorant amongst the people,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Iqtidārāt wa chand lauḥ dīgar, p. 111.

“The general criterion is what we mentioned and any soul who has success in it, meaning recognizes and realizes the Sunrise of Manifestation (meaning himself), will be mentioned in the Divine Book as someone who possesses reason or else he will be (mentioned as) ignorant even if he himself thinks that his reason equals that of the whole world,”

Reference: `Abd a l-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 7, p. 160.

“No one has denied or will deny what has been revealed by the Ancient Pen (meaning himself) in this Most Great Manifestation regarding society, unity, manners, rites, and being occupied with what has benefits for the people, except that he completely lacks reason,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Iqtidārāt wa chand lauḥ dīgar, p. 168.

 

3. Removing Prejudice or Claiming Each Baha’i worth More than a Million Non-Baha’is?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: People must not regard themselves superior to others.

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt), vol. 3, p. 107.

Bahā’u’llāh: “My friends are the pearls of [this] order and all others are earthly pebbles . . . a single one of these (Baha’is) is more precious than a million others (non-Baha’is),”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 4, p. 353.

 

4. Removing Prejudice or Depriving Non-Baha’is from Their Share of Inheritance?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: All people have equal rights.

“There is equality between people and complete brotherhood. Justice implies that the rights of humankind be protected and preserved and all have equal rights,”

Reference:`Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 30.

Bahā’u’llāh: Non-Baha’is do not inherit from their Baha’i parents.

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 184.

 

5. Removing All Prejudice or Calling Non-Baha’is Animals

`Abdu’l-Bahā: The truth can only be exposed when all religions remove prejudice.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p.18.

Bahā’u’llāh: Non-Baha’is are animals.

“Today, according to the decree of the Point of Bayān (meaning the Bāb), those individuals who turn away from this Novel Affair (meaning Baha’ism) are deprived of the garb of being called and described [as humans?] and are assembled and mentioned as animals in the presence of God,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 213.

“Do not see the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism) but as earthworms and their sounds but the buzzing of flies,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Āthār-i Qalam-i A`lā, vol. 1, no. 20, p. 183.

“O group of polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism), if you take pride in your name remaining amongst the animals or being mentioned amongst the livestock, then take pride in that for you are worthy of it,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Āthār-i Qalam-i A`lā, vol. 2, no. 81, p. 452.

“Oh you donkeys! Whatever God says is the truth and will not become void by the words of the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism),”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 174.

“When the one who turned away from God halted (in accepting me) and fell off the path, in that moment his body left the garb of humanness and appeared and became visible in the skin of animals. Sanctified is He who changes the beings how he likes,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 110.

 

6. Removing All Prejudice or Calling Non-Baha’is Bastards

`Abdu’l-Bahā: “This century, is the century of progress. These prejudices are unjustified. These are rooted in ignorance.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 25.

Bahā’u’llāh: Non-Baha’is are Bastards.

“Whoever denies this apparent exalted luminous grace (meaning Baha’ism), it is worthy that he asks his state from his mother and he will soon be returned to the bottom of hell,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 4, pp. 355 and `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganj-i shāygān, p. 78.

“Whoever has the enmity of this servant (meaning Bahā’u’llāh) in his heart, certainly Satan has entered their mother’s bed,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganj-i shāygān, p. 79.

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

 

 

 

Is This Principle Correct From a Rational and Logical Perspective?

Not all forms of prejudice and zeal can be considered bad. For instance, national prejudice and zeal, in times of foreign intervention, is by no means detestable, rather it is necessary. Bahā’u’llāh even detests national prejudice and pride:

“There is no pride in loving ones country, rather [there is only pride] in loving the whole world.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Ishrāqāt wa chand lauḥ dīgar, pp. 20–21.

`Abdu’l-Bahā further advocates this belief:

“We title every fenced patch [of land] homeland and fancifully call it mother[land], whilst planet Earth is everybody’s mother[land], not this fenced patch. We live a few days on this earth and will finally be buried in it. It is our eternal grave. Is it reasonable to shed blood over this eternal grave and rip each-other apart? Of course not! Neither God is satisfied with nor does any rational person admit [such a thing]. Pay attention to the blessed animals which have no territorial disputes and have complete friendship with one-another and live in groups. For instance, if an eastern pigeon, a western pigeon, a northern pigeon, and a southern pigeon, come together at a single location, they immediately show affection to each other. All blessed animals and birds are like this too. As for predatory animals, as soon as they see each other, they attack and tear one another apart. It is impossible for them to live in a unit land.”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt), vol. 3, pp. 105–106.

Are our mother lands just a patch of fenced off earth that we shouldn’t care about?

Should we only care about the earth as a whole?

If a foreign force invades us what do we do?

Should we lay down our arms, and allow them to invade, just like what `Abdu’l-Bahā did when the British invaded Palestine?

History shows that this attitude is not limited to laying down arms and in extreme cases results in serving the enemy. It was because of this attitude that `Abdu’l-Bahā was awarded the title of Knighthood for his service to the invading forces. The same invading forces who in a few years, would lay the foundations for a nation whose very foundations were based on national and tribal prejudice: A Jewish country for a Jewish people. Is this how prejudice is removed?

Baha’is relate `Abdu’l-Bahā’s Knighthood to humanitarian services. This title is given to a person who serves the British Empire, not to someone who provides humanitarian services to people being oppressed under an invading army. What is more ironic, is the fact that the title of knighthood is provided by the invading forces, not the defenders.

This attitude was not only limited to `Abdu’l-Bahā’. During the Russian wars with Persia, Bahā’u’llāh was imprisoned for his alleged role in plotting to kill Nāṣir al-Dīn Shah. In a series of events, whose reason was never revealed, the Russian government exerted pressure on the Iranian government to free Bahā’u’llāh from prison. These efforts bore fruit and Bahā’u’llāh was released after four months. A tablet was revealed by Bahā’u’llāh to thank the Russian government:

“In the days when this Wronged One was sore-afflicted in prison, the minister of the highly esteemed government (of Russia)—may God, glorified and exalted be He, assist him! exerted his utmost endeavor to compass My deliverance. Several times permission for My release was granted. Some of the `ulamās of the city, however, would prevent it. Finally, My freedom was gained through the solicitude and the endeavor of His Excellency the Minister . . . His Imperial Majesty, the Most Great Emperor—may God, exalted and glorified be He, assist him!—extended to Me for the sake of God his protection—a protection which has excited the envy and enmity of the foolish ones of the earth.”

Reference: Shoghi Effendi, God Passes By, p. 106

Pay attention to Bahā’u’llāh’s prayers for the Russian government. He asks God, twice, to “assist” the government whose country is invading his homeland! Why? Only because they secured his release from prison. Bahā’u’llāh doesn’t even care that this government is the same government who is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people in his homeland in their bid to conquer it and take over its natural resources. It seems that the only thing he cares about is his own freedom.

Bahā’u’llāh claims that the Russians extended their protection for him “for the sake of God.” One wonders if the Russians truly offered protection for the followers of a group who were inciting civil war in a country that they were at war with, merely “for the sake of God”.

This does not mean that prejudice and zeal are justified in every case. Extreme neutrality is just as problematic as extreme prejudice. Defending one’s country, family, or tribe during certain times of danger does not mean that one should defend every unjust action that happens in it. Clearly this is not a case of black and white.

Should we not have prejudice towards the truth?

Are truth and falsehood the same?

Are the oppressed and the oppressor the same?

When the Nazi’s invaded France in World War II, should the French have laid down their arms and ignored the situation, because the entire earth is their homeland, not just France?

This is a clear example of the classic situation in which, in an attempt to remedy one extreme, someone has fallen into the opposite extreme.

It is up to you to draw your own conclusions!

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

 

Did the Founders of Baha’ism Refrain From Prejudice?

4- Baha’is Have No Prejudice.

`Abdu’l-Bahā says:

Praise God that you have accepted this great affair that is the light of the horizons and the promoter of the oneness of humanity. You detest all prejudice and show utmost compassion and kindness to all religions. You love all humanity.

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt), vol. 3, pp. 81–82.

We must not desire ourselves and must regard others as better than ourselves, even those who are not believers . . . we must see all people superior to ourselves . . . we must see other peoples shortcomings as our own shortcomings for if we didn’t have shortcomings ourselves we couldn’t have seen the shortcomings of others. Man must always see himself as imperfect and others perfect.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 49, p. 326–327.

 

5- Baha’is Have No Prejudice but Non-Baha’is Are Animals

According to Bahā’u’llāh non-Baha’is are animals:

“Today, according to the decree of the Point of Bayān (meaning the Bāb), those individuals who turn away from this Novel Affair (meaning Baha’ism) are deprived of the garb of being called and described [as humans?] and are assembled and mentioned as animals in the presence of God.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 213.

“Do not see the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism) but as earthworms and their sounds but the buzzing of flies,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Āthār-i Qalam-i A`lā, vol. 1, no. 20, p. 183.

“O group of polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism), if you take pride in your name remaining amongst the animals or being mentioned amongst the livestock, then take pride in that for you are worthy of it,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Āthār-i Qalam-i A`lā, vol. 2, no. 81, p. 452.

Instead of preaching to non-Baha’is, `Abdu’l-Bahā should have reminded his father that:

“This century, is the century of progress. These prejudices are unjustified. These are rooted in ignorance.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 25.

Is considering non-Baha’is to be non-humans not a clear sign of prejudice? Whose words should Baha’is adhere to? `Abdu’l-Bahā who claims prejudice is rooted in ignorance? Or Bahā’u’llāh who insists on having prejudice?

 

6- Baha’is Are Jewels and Other People Worthless Rocks

If any creed or group had claimed that they themselves were jewels and all other people were worthless pieces of rock, would Baha’is not have expressed their dissatisfaction because of such blatant prejudice?

Why is it acceptable for Bahā’u’llāh to utter such words:

“My friends are the pearls of [this] order and all others are earthly pebbles . . . a single one of these (Baha’is) is more precious than a million others (non-Baha’is).”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 4, p. 353.

Why must one show such ignorance, as `Abdu’l-Bahā puts it, by having all this prejudice:

“We must neither say bad things nor quarrel. We must know that all are the servants of one God and are encompassed with his sea of mercy . . . see how ignorant people can be by being prisoners of such prejudice.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 25.

Even though the words of the leaders of this creed have a high degree of prejudice in them, `Abdu’l-Bahā announces with great pride that:

“We must thank God a hundred thousand times every moment, that thank-god, we have been freed from ignorant prejudice and are kind to all of God’s sheep.”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt), vol. 3, p. 43.

 

7- Non-Baha’is Inherit Nothing from Baha’i Parents

If in the Baha’i creed, religious prejudice has really been abolished, and all people, regardless of their religion have equal rights, then why are non-Baha’is deprived of their share of inheritance from their deceased parents?

“Bahā’u’llāh states that non-Baha’is have no right to inherit from their Bahā’ī parents or relatives,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 184.

And why does `Abdu’l-Bahā insist that there are equality of rights:

“There is equality between people and complete brotherhood. Justice implies that the rights of humankind be protected and preserved and all have equal rights.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 30.

How can such discriminatory laws be considered just and manifestations of complete brotherhood?

How are they not examples of clear religious prejudice?

Perhaps Baha’u’llah has a totally new definition for prejudice.

 

8- Racial prejudice in Baha’i teachings

“The inhabitants of a land like Africa are all like wild savages and land-dwelling animals that lack common-sense and knowledge and are all wild. There is not a single wise and civilized person among them,”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt), vol. 1, pp. 331

“The wild tribes have no superiority over animals. For example, what is the difference between African blacks and American blacks? The [black Africans] are cows that God has created with human faces. The [black Americans] are civilized, intelligent, and have culture,”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Khaṭābāt (Tehran), vol. 3, p. 48.

 

9- Sexual Prejudice

`Abdu’l-Bahā:

“To reach the goal of (removing prejudice) we strive . . . but others just talk.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 99.

Now let us see if this is true:

A woman’s question was referred to him who had asked why hasn’t God made any woman Prophets and why have all Divine Manifestations been men. He answered, ‘Although women and men share the same capacities and abilities, there is definitely no doubt that men are superior and stronger. Even in animals like pigeons, sparrows, peacocks, and other [birds] this advantage is visible,’

Reference: Maḥmūd Zaraqānī, Badā’i` al-āthār, vol. 1, p. 153.

 “The deceased’s property are split into 2520 portions. Out of these, 1080 are for the children, 390 for the wives, fathers 330, mothers 270, brothers 210, sisters 150, teachers 90”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 10, p. 117–119.

Women cannot be a member of the Universal House of Justice.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 27, p. 219.

 

10- What is the position of Non Baha’is

“Anyone who has a garden will not allow the dry trees to remain in the garden and will definitely cut them and throw them in fire, for dry wood is only worthy of fire. Thus, O inhabitants of my orchard, protect yourselves from the wicked poisonous breath and void breeze which is socializing with the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism) and the unaware (ghāfil),”

“Do not socialize with those who deny God (meaning non-Baha’is) and his signs and keep away from their kind,”

“In it incumbent on ever soul to keep away from the wicked breath of the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism),”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 8, p. 39.

“Know that God has forbidden his friends from meeting with the polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism) and hypocrites,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 4, p. 280. for more quotes refer to chapter 2.

“God will soon take out from the sleeves of power the hands of strength and dominance and will make the Servant (Bahā’u’llāh) victorious and will cleanse the earth from the filth of every rejected polytheist (deniers of Baha’ism). And they will stand by the cause and will conquer the lands using my mighty eternal name and will enter the lands and they will be feared by all the servants,”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Āthār-i Qalam-i A`lā, vol. 2, no. 90, p. 587.

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

 

The Removal of All Prejudice

“The fifth Baha’i principle is that sexual prejudice, religious prejudice, spiritual prejudice, national prejudice, and political prejudice are the destroyers of human foundations and any form of prejudice ruins the basis of humankind. Not until these prejudices are removed, will the human world attain tranquility. The proof for [this claim] is that all wars and battles and all enmities and hatreds which have occurred amongst humans were either the result of national prejudice or the result of political prejudice. The human world has not seen peace for 6000 years and the reason for this lack of peace is these prejudices. Until there is prejudice, there will be war, there will be hatred, there will be enmity, and there will be inconvenience. If the human world is to attain comfort, we must dump all these prejudices or else tranquility will be impossible.”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Khaṭābāt (Tehran), vol. 2, pp. 147–148.

 

Did the Founders of Baha’ism Refrain From Prejudice?

A quick review of Baha’i scripture and history shows that Baha’i leaders have shown great a great amount of prejudice regarding different matters. We will now enumerate some of these instances:

1- The Bāb

Some of the most extreme and most violent prejudice and zeal in Baha’i history can be found in the laws and actions of the Bāb:

The order to destroy all non-Bābī books.

Reference: The Bāb, Farsi Bayān: “Chapter six of the sixth unit which is about destroying all books but those that have been written or will be written about this order (meaning the Bab’s creed).”

The order to destroy all monuments.

Reference: “The utterance of the [book or religion] of Bayān in the day of the appearance of his Highness A`lā (meaning the Bāb) was to behead, burn the books, destroy the monuments, and massacre [everyone] but those who believed [in the Bāb’s religion] and verified it,” `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt: 1330 AH), vol. 2, p. 266

The order to exile or massacre all non-Bābī people.

Reference: The Bāb, Farsi Bayān: “The sixteenth chapter of the seventh unit which is about [the decree] that all rulers who rise who are [followers] of the religion of the Bayan, leave no-one in their land who is not a follower of this religion. This is compulsory upon all the people too”; “The utterance of the [book or religion] of Bayān in the day of the appearance of his Highness A`lā (meaning the Bāb) was to behead, burn the books, destroy the monuments, and massacre [everyone] but those who believed [in the Bāb’s religion] and verified it,” `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb (Egypt: 1330 AH), vol. 2, p. 266.

Prohibition of teaching any book but those that the Bāb had revealed.

Reference: The Bāb, Farsi Bayān: “The tenth chapter of the fourth unit which is about [the decree] that it is prohibited to teach any book but the book of Bayān.”

The order to confiscate the wealth of non-Bābīs.

Reference: The Bāb, Farsi Bayan: “The fifth chapter of the fifth unit which is about the decree of taking the property of those who do not believe in [the religion] of Bayan and giving it back if they become believers in this religion, except in the lands where taking [property] is not possible.”

Even with all these savage and irrational laws, Baha’i prejudice and zeal towards the Bāb is so great that he is regarded by them as one of the greatest prophets of God. Bahā’u’llāh had so much zeal with respect to the Bāb that he had uttered that a single word from his book was more dear to him than anything in the skies and on the earth.

Reference: “I [swear by] He who in His hand is my soul and my essence, a single letter from the Bayān is dearer to me than everything that is in the heavens and the earth,” Asad-Allāh Fāḍil Māzandarānī,Asrār al-āthār khuṣūṣī, vol. 5, p. 333.

 

2- Removal of Prejudice: Only for Non-Baha’is

If all prejudice and zeal must be put aside, even religious zeal, then Baha’is too, must put aside their religious beliefs and stop preaching their religion to others. As we previously showed, when `Abdu’l-Bahā speaks about setting aside religious prejudice, he only addresses non-Baha’is:

“Zoroastrians say we are right, Jews say we are right, Christians say we are right, and Buddhists say we are right. How can the [one who is really] right be shown? The follower of Moses must put aside prejudice, the Christian must put aside prejudice, and the Buddhist must put aside prejudice. Not until this is performed will it be possible to expose the truth . . . [no one] should have prejudice.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p.18.

Why have Baha’is been excluded from this order?

Why shouldn’t they too put aside prejudice?

Why don’t Baha’is practice what they preach?

Why does `Abdu’l-Bahā state that words needs actions but his own words remain only as words:

“Words need actions. Words without actions are like a bee without honey or a tree without fruits.”

Reference: Riyāḍ Qadīmī, Gulzār-i ta`ālim Bahā’ī, p. 1.

 

3- Baha’i Attitude Toward Deniers

The Baha’i corpus is filled with sentences about the need to put aside all prejudice. For example:

“Keep aloof from the scent of ignorant prejudice, enmity, vulgar hatred, and sexual, national and religious delusions, for they are all against God’s religion and His satisfaction and will deprive mankind of God’s graces . . . do not have the slightest hatred towards anyone from any nation, religion, tribe, sex, or land, rather show utmost compassion and friendship.”

Reference: Riyāḍ Qadīmī, Gulzār-i ta`ālim Bahā’ī, pp. 366–367.

But when it concerns Baha’ism directly, this is no longer the case and a very disturbing prejudice can be seen in Bahā’u’llāh’s orders:

“We must avoid deniers in all affairs and must not become fond of them or sit and converse with them even for a moment, for by God the [effect of] evil individuals on pure individuals is like fire on dry wood and heat on cold snow.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Mā’idiy-i āsimānī, vol. 8, pp. 39.

 

Contradictions

Bahā’u’llāh:
“Contradiction has and will not ever have a way in the sanctified realm of the Divine Manifestations.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 126.

1. Is Equalizing the Means of Livelihood a New Principle?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Former religious book have not spoken about this problem.

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 455.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: “We ordered that the zakāt be paid as has been revealed in the Quran.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 12, p. 149.

 

2. Is Usury Good or Bad? Does `Abdu’l-Bahā Hate Bahā’u’llāh’s Favors to the People?

`Bahā’u’llāh: We made usury legal as a favor to God’s servants.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 24, p. 202.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Even though usury is allowed no one is allowed to engage in such an act because I hate it.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 24, p. 204.

 

3. Helping the Needy a Legal Obligation or Voluntary?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: The wealthy must voluntarily help the poor.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Helping the needy must be enforced by law.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 135 & 148.

 

4. Equalization of Means of Livelihood or Paying Thousands of Tons of Gold to the UHJ?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Remedying the means of livelihood for humans is necessary.

Bahā’u’llāh: After 20 times of adultery pay 34 tons of gold to the UHJ and after 100 times, 8000 times the weight of earth.

Refer the previous posts for sayings and references on above.

 

5. Equalization of the Means of Livelihood or Depriving Some of Any Livelihood at All?

When the Baha’i kingdom materializes thieves and excommunicated individuals (No one is allowed to speak or interact with these individuals) are kicked out of the community and are deprived of means of livelihood.

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, pp. 35–36.

 

6. Must There Be Complete Equality between All People?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: There must be complete equality between all people.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Complete equality is not possible in the community because people have different ranks and are from different classes.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 30 & 138

 

7. Has God Made Distinctions between People?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: God has created people without any differences or distinctions.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: People have different degrees of intelligence.

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 42 & 134.

 

We request the readers to read the book Payām-i malakūt. As quoted above you will find contradictions in the sayings of Abdul Baha. On difference pages different sayings exist which contradicts the previous saying.

We leave it upon the readers to draw their own conclusion!

Four means devised by Bahā’u’llāh and `Abdu’l-Bahā to Equalize the means of livelihood

If the purpose of this principle is the assistance of the needy by the wealthy and implementation of a series of laws and legislations which help in closing the income gap between different groups of the community, then yes it is completely logical and rational. The problem in reaching such a goal, is to bring forward a practical program and to introduce a system which allows the efficient implementation of such a program.

`Abdu’l-Bahā believes the only program that can reach this goal is the one devised by Bahā’u’llāh:

“The economic problem will not be completely solved but by these teachings, rather, it is impossible [to solve them by any other method].”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 135.

He believes that to overcome economic problems, the first group in which reform must take place in are the farmers because they make up the bulk of the working class:

“The economic problem [must be solved] by starting from the farmers until it reaches other groups. For the population of farmers is many more times higher than other [working] classes. Thus, it is worthy to start from the farmers and farmers are the foremost working class of the community. Yes, in each village a council consisting of the most rational people of the village must be set up and the village must be managed by that council. A public storehouse must be built and a secretary assigned to it. At the time of harvest, with the knowledge of the council, some of the produce from [all farmers] must be taken to supply the storehouse.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, pp. 135–136.

What `Abdu’l-Bahā proposes is neither novel nor exceptional. The only point that is somewhat troubling is the fact that the poor farmers and peasants have been selected as the first class that must be reformed. This reformation is in no way helpful to them because they must give up some of their produce for the welfare of others, while the role of other groups in this system has not been specified.

The justification for starting with the peasants is even more interesting: they make up a larger portion of the community. Would it not be better to start with the minority groups who hold the largest wealth in the community and not the majority groups who are themselves the neediest? It seems awfully convenient for the small elite controlling all the wealth that it is the farmers and pheasants who should take the first step.

Four means have been devised by Bahā’u’llāh and `Abdu’l-Bahā to Equalize the means of livelihood

  1. Inheritance

Inheritance is distributed amongst seven groups.

“The deceased’s property are split into 2520 portions. Out of these, 1080 are for the children, 390 for the wives, fathers 330, mothers 270, brothers 210, sisters 150, teachers 90”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 10, pp. 117–119.

Under some circumstances portions of the inheritance are handed over to the Universal House of Justice. If deemed appropriate, the UHJ can use some of this money for equalization of the means of livelihood or for propagating Baha’i beliefs. Inheritance is only distributed in the aforementioned manner if the deceased does not leave a will. If the deceased has specified in his will for his wealth to be distributed in a manner which goes against the equalization of the means of livelihood, no one can protest his or her decision.
Furthermore, inheritance usually stays in the family and is not distributed in the community to help those who are in need.

In any case, the laws of inheritance in the Baha’i creed do not have a meaningful influence in achieving the goal of the current principle, and are sometimes in conflict with it. For instance, as we already pointed out, the living residence of the deceased becomes the property of his eldest son, even if the deceased has left no other wealth.

2. Tax

In the Baha’i creed two kinds of taxes are payable. The first is paid to the government according to the laws of each country. The government then does with these taxes what it wishes, whether waging war or helping the needy. This tax has nothing to do with equalizing the means of livelihood.

The second is called `ushr (one tenth) which is a religious tax imposed on Baha’is in accordance with Baha’i law.

`Abdu’l-Bahā says:

“It is not fair to put the same tax on both the rich and the needy. The needy must be exempted from paying tax. It is not fair that the needy pay one tenth as tax and the wealthy pay one tenth too . . . laws are needed [to address this] issue . . . I will tell you God’s law [regarding this issue] . . . the farmers plant crops in a village and produce is harvested. One tenth of the harvest is taken from both the rich and the needy [as tax]. Then a public storehouse is erected in the village and both the tax and the produce are gathered there. It is then possible to see who is wealthy and who is poor. Nothing will be taken from the farmers who have been able to produce only enough to feed their families and procure their daily needs. All the produce and taxes are now in the general storehouse. If there are crippled people in the village, their minimum sustenance will be provided from the storehouse. On the other hand, a wealthy person who [for instance] needs only fifty thousand kilos for a living but has produced five hundred thousand kilos will be taxed twice as much (meaning one fifth) and whatever remains in the storehouse at the end of the year will be employed for general use.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, pp. 148–150.

In this plan which is slightly different from the previous one, the poor still remain poor and the rich, rich. In the aforementioned system, the poorer farmer classes achieve nothing extra from the taxes and no equalization of the means of livelihood is achieved. The only group that benefits from this system are a small number of crippled people.

Thus, the wealthy classes still keep the bulk of their wealth and accumulate it while the poorer classes retain what they had before and nothing is added to it. The plan devised by `Abdu’l-Bahā does not help in the flow of wealth from the wealthy to the poor and no equalization is achieved. It may sound interesting on paper, but in action achieves nothing novel. It resembles the tax systems employed in all governments.

3. Huqūq Allah

Huqūq Allah or God’s Share, is a form of tax Baha’is must pay to the Universal House of Justice. When a Baha’i person’s wealth exceeds the price of nineteen mithqāls of gold, 19 percent of the wealth must be handed over to the UHJ.

Refer: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 9, pp. 94 & 101.

This tax is then used by the UHJ in whatever affairs they deem appropriate and is in no way guaranteed to be used for the equalization of the means of livelihood.

4. Zakāt tax

“We ordered that the zakāt be paid as has been revealed in the Quran.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 12, p. 149.

 

As we can see, the Baha’i system proposed for the equalization of the means of livelihood is based on systems that were already implemented in government taxing systems or have been borrowed from Islamic Sharia. The irony is that the proposed system has a minimal effect on the Equalization of the Means of Livelihood for All Humanity, for wealth is not redistributed among the needy in a manner which helps close the gap between the rich and the poor, rather, it is merely a method for taxing the people of society.

It is up to you to draw your own conclusions!

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

Outrageous Fines For Different Crimes

Fine for fornication and adultery

“God hath imposed a fine on every adulterer and adulteress, to be paid to the House of Justice nine mithqāls of gold, to be doubled if they should repeat the offence . . . Although the term translated here as adultery refers, in its broadest sense, to unlawful sexual intercourse between either married or unmarried individuals (see note 36 for a definition of the term), `Abdu’l-Bahā has specified that the punishment here prescribed is for sexual intercourse between persons who are unmarried . . . In relation to the application of the fine, Bahā’u’llāh clearly specifies that each succeeding fine is double the preceding one; thus the fine imposed increases in geometrical progression.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, pp. 200–202.

Unmarried people who engage in acts of sexual intercourse—especially teenagers— will likely frequently perform such acts. The number of times copulation occurs in a year can easily reach one hundred times if this shameful act is performed only twice a week. The amount of gold payable by each of these two people equals to: 3.6 grams * 9 * 2^100 = 41071879447394632608493183854 kilograms, which is fairly equal to 8000 times the weight of the earth. Just in case you are wondering, the fine will be about 34000 kilos of Gold if copulation is performed only 20 times. We’ll leave it to up to the readers to judge the practicality of these luminous laws. One wonders how a society governed by this law will ever be able to get closer to economic justice and attaining a means of livelihood for all people.

In fact this law is so outrageous that, as is standard for problematic Baha’i laws, its implementation has been postponed until a future time:

“The imposition of this fine is intended for a future condition of society, at which time the law will be supplemented and applied by the Universal House of Justice.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 201.

Excommunication and Shunning

Excommunicated members of the community have to break all ties with their family members. If the breadwinner of the family is excommunicated, his/her family will be left with no source of income. Likewise, if a dependent is excommunicated, they will have to fend off for themselves and find an alternative source of sustenance. Is this how the means of livelihood are equalized in this creed?

Deceased’s living residence

According to Baha’i law a deceased’s living residence is solely the property of his oldest son even if the deceased has left no other wealth behind:

“The living residence belongs to the oldest living son, whether or not the deceased has any other wealth. The oldest living son also takes his share from the other belongings.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 10, p. 128.

Treatment of Thieves

Where does a thief receive sustenance from after being punished according to Baha’i law?

“Exile and imprisonment are decreed for the thief, and, on the third offence, place ye a mark upon his brow so that, thus identified, he may not be accepted in the cities of God and His countries.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, pp. 35–36.

If a thief is caught for the third time a mark must be put on his brow so that he will not be accepted in any city or country. Thus he will be completely deprived of all means of livelihood!

Is this law problematic?

No problem, this is how it is resolved:

“The punishments for theft are intended for a future condition of society, when they will be supplemented and applied by the Universal House of Justice.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 198.

 

What is Equalization of the Means of Livelihood and Did the Founders of the Baha’i Creed Follow this principle?

The Equalization of the Means of Livelihood for All Humanity means that universal wealth must be distributed in such a way that all people—rich or poor—live in peace and tranquility.

Did the Founders of the Baha’i Creed Follow this principle?

1- Confiscating the wealth of all non-Bābīs:

Bab had given orders to confiscate the wealth of all who didn’t believe in him:

“The fifth chapter of the fifth unit which is about the decree of taking the property of those who do not believe in [the religion] of Bayan and giving it back if they become believers in this religion, except in the lands where taking [property] is not possible.”

Reference: The Bāb, Farsi Bayān, unit 5, chap. 5.

2- All kinds of outrageous fines for Bābīs

In the book of Bayān, for every misdemeanor committed, an outrageous fine has to be paid to the Bāb. For instance:

“You have been prohibited in the Bayān from having more than nineteen books. If you do so, you will be fined 19 mithqāls of gold.”

Reference: The Bāb, Arabic Bayān, unit 11, chap. 7.

“He who deliberately saddens another [follower of the Bāb], must pay a fine of nineteen mithqāls of gold, or else silver, or else must repent to God nineteen times.”

Reference: The Bāb, Farsi Bayān, unit 7, chap. 18.

“It has been destined in the sixth chapter to remember God’s Oneness nineteen times [every day] from the beginning of night to the end of day. If you do not perform this [deliberately] after you have been informed, a fine of 19 mithqāls of fine diamonds will be imposed.”

Reference: The Bāb, Lauḥ haykal al-dīn, chap. 6, p. 3.

After the aforementioned decree, he continues to order the remembrance of himself, and other figures every day for nineteen times and imposes the following fines if such an act is not performed: nineteen mithqāls of gold, five mithqāls of red rubies, and five mithqāls of yellow rubies. The Bab’s writings are replete with fines of this form.

3- Loans with Interest and Usury

Usury has been prohibited in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam:

“If you lend money to one of my people among you who is needy, do not treat it like a business deal; charge no interest.”

Reference: Exodus, 22:25

“Do not take interest or any profit from them, but fear your God, so that they may continue to live among you. You must not lend them money at interest or sell them food at a profit.”

Reference: Leviticus, 25:36–37

“And for taking interest, which was forbidden, and for consuming the people’s money unjustly, we have prepared for the disbelievers among them a painful retribution.”

Reference: Quran 4:161

Now let us see what Mr. Bahā’u’llāh says:

“We see many people who are in need of [these kinds of loans]. If there is no profit [in the loan] the affairs will not move forward. It is very rare that someone becomes successful in tolerating and heeding someone who is the same gender as himself, his countryman, or brethren, and gives them a loan without interest. So, as a favor to [God’s] servants, we made loans with interest like all other forms of deals which people make with each-other. The profit gained [by lending] money, is now permissible, pure, and clean, because this order has been revealed from the Sky of Ordinance, so that the people of earth can be engrossed in remembering/speaking about the Beloved of the World, with utmost peace, tranquility, happiness, and pleasure.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 24, p. 202.

Bahā’u’llāh’s justification for allowing interest is “If there is no profit [in the loan] the affairs will not move forward.” Didn’t God know this when He prohibited this act in all other religions?

He further claims that lending with interest is a favor from God so that people would become engrossed in remembering him with peace and tranquility. The only thing that is clear is having a loan with interest neither brings peace nor tranquility.

Abdul Baha says:

“From now on do not give loans with interest to anyone because `Abdu’l-Bahā dislikes interest even though it is legitimate. Only give [loans] without interest and take no loan with interest from anybody.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 24, p. 204.

Again, there is a clear contradiction between Bahā’u’llāh and his son. It is not clear why `Abdu’l-Bahā, who is only allowed to interpret Bahā’u’llāh’s laws, directly orders his followers to disobey his father’s orders and deprives them of the “favor to [God’s] servants.”

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

Introduction

“Every human being has the right to live; they have a right to rest, and to a certain amount of well-being. As a rich man is able to live in his palace surrounded by luxury and the greatest comfort, so should a poor man be able to have the necessaries of life. Nobody should die of hunger; everybody should have sufficient clothing; one man should not live in excess while another has no possible means of existence.”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Paris Talks, pp. 131–132.

`Abdu’l-Bahā says:

“People are of different [social] classes. Some are extremely wealthy others extremely poor. One lives in a splendid palace whilst another doesn’t even have a hole [to live in]. One has all kinds of food on his table another doesn’t even have a single loaf of bread . . . thus the means of livelihood for people must be remedied.

“It is better that moderation be introduced. Moderation means a series of laws and systems must be put in place which prevent some people from unnecessary accumulation of wealth and [at the same time] provide the necessary needs of the public.”

“The wealthy must have mercy on the poor, but out of free will not by force. It is useless if force is used. There must not be force but a general law by which everyone will know their duty.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 134, p. 142, p. 148.

Abdul Baha contradicts himself in above sayings. Firstly he speaks about different social classes, then he recommends to make a series of law and then finally he says it should be out of free will. If it is out of free will then what is the use of making a series of laws.