Equality Of Men And Women

Equality Of Men And Women

Membership in the Universal House of Justice

According to Baha’i law, women cannot become members of the Universal House of Justice (UHJ).

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 27, p. 219.

If there is equality between men and women, then why can women not be elected to take a seat in this governing body of the Baha’i world community? Why is the highest attainable spiritual and managing station in Baha’ism off-limits to women?

This contradiction is so obvious that even `Abdu’l-Bahā has tried to justify it:

The House of Justice, however, according to the explicit text of the Law of God, is confined to men; this for a wisdom of the Lord God’s, which will ere long be made manifest as clearly as the sun at high noon.

Reference: Various, A Compilation on Women (Research Department of the Universal House of Justice, Bahā’ī World Centre, 1986), p. 7

This justification fails to address the issue of equality of rights, for whatever the wisdom behind this law—contrary to Baha’i claims of equality—the inequality between the sexes is still retained!

Furthermore, as is the usual Baha’i attitude with respect to problematic laws, the matter has been passed to the future to silence any criticism.

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

Dowry & Polygamy

Bahā’u’llāh says:

“No marriage may be contracted without payment of a dowry, which hath been fixed for city-dwellers at nineteen mithqāls (3.6 grams) of pure gold, and for village-dwellers at the same amount in silver. Whoso wisheth to increase this sum, it is
forbidden him to exceed the limit of ninety-five mithqāls. Thus hath the command been writ in majesty and power.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, pp. 207-8

Why would a creed who preaches novelty in its laws and equality between men and women, ask men to pay dowry to women? Why not the opposite? If there is equality and no discrimination between the sexes then why should one party pay the other? Either, no side should pay the other, or both sides should pay equal amounts. How can a creed that cannot abide by its own laws of equality among its adherents,preach global equality of rights between men and women and between all races?

If according to Bahā’u’llāh’s second principle, God has made no distinction between people, then why should villagers be entitled to a dowry of silver but city-dwellers to a dowry of gold?

Polygamy:

Even though Baha’is express opposition to polygamy, their leader was a polygamist and had three wives. Bahā’u’llāh even allowed his followers to have two wives and an unspecified number of virgins at their service:

“God hath prescribed matrimony unto you. Beware that ye take not unto yourselves more wives than two. Whoso contenteth himself with a single partner from among the maidservants of God, both he and she shall live in tranquillity. And he who would take into his service a maid may do so with propriety [He who takes a virgin to serve him it would be permissible for him].”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 41

What we have quoted is the official Baha’i translation. Unfortunately the correct translation of the last sentence has been deliberately distorted. This is the original Arabic text: “man ‘ittakhadha bikran li khidmatih lā ba’sa `alayh.” Which translates to: “He who takes a virgin to serve him, there is no problem with that.” We have placed this in square brackets at the end of the quote.

Why do Baha’is distort their scripture? What are they trying to hide? How does it make sense to speak about taking a virgin for service—or a maid according to the flawed translation—in the middle of a discussion about marriage? Are wives solely seen as an instrument to perform house choirs who can be replaced with a serving virgin or maid? Or does one who cannot marry, can simply satisfy himself with a virgin who serves him?

The context of Bahā’u’llāh’s words when viewed within the undistorted translation, imply another meaning which we will leave to the readers to judge.

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

 

 

Women And Inheritance – Abdul Baha’s Approach

let us see how `Abdu’l-Bahā being the oldest son, acted towards the moral responsibilities that he himself introduced.

In the following table we have listed the wives and children of Bahā’u’llāh who `Abdu’l-Bahā was morally responsible for.

The people that `Abdu’l-Bahā was morally responsible for and their fate:

Name Relation with`Abdu’l-Bahā Death Fate
Gowhar Step-mother AfterBahā’u’llāh Covenant breaker
Fatemeh MahdiUlya Step-mother AfterBahā’u’llāh Covenant-breaker
Assiyeh Khanum Mother BeforeBahā’u’llāh
Forughuyeh Nuri Half-sister AfterBahā’u’llāh Covenant breaker
Bahieh Khanum Sister AfterBahā’u’llāh Faithful
Mirza Mihdi Brother BeforeBahā’u’llāh
Muhammad Ali Half-brother AfterBahā’u’llāh Covenant breaker
Samadiyyih Nuri Half-sister AfterBahā’u’llāh Covenant breaker
Diya’u’llah Half-brother AfterBahā’u’llāh Covenant breaker
Badi’u’llah Half-brother AfterBahā’u’llāh Covenant breaker

Out of the eight people that `Abdul’-Bahā was responsible for—other than his sister—all others were labeled as covenant breakers and shunned them from the Baha’i community by `Abdu’l-Bahā and Shoghi! Is this is the meaning of “moral responsibility” and “considering the needs of the other heirs”?!

As we already said, Bahā’u’llāh proclaimed that:

“We have assigned the residence and personal clothing of the deceased to the male, not female, offspring”

“He specifies that if there be more than one residence, the principal and most important one passes to the male offspring.”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 186

Now here is the catch, Bahā’u’llāh does not say that these belong to the oldest male, but states they belong to the male offspring. The Arabic text of the Aqdas too clearly shows this meaning. Now why would `Abdu’l-Bahā change this law and limit the heirs of the deceased’s living residence to only the oldest living male instead of all the male offspring? Are we supposed to believe it has nothing to do with the fact that he himself was Bahā’u’llāh’s oldest living male offspring?

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

 

 

Women And Inheritance Part 2

As we have seen, in contrast to the principle of “Equality of Men and Women,” there is neither equality nor unity in the laws of inheritance regarding these two sexes.

To justify this discrimination, Baha’i leaders have brought forth an argument:

In a Tablet, ‘Abdu’l-Bahā indicates that the residence and personal clothing of a deceased man remain in the male line. They pass to the eldest son and in the absence of the eldest son, they pass to the second-eldest son, and so on. He explains that this provision is an expression of the law of primogeniture, which has invariably been upheld by the Law of God.

In a Tablet to a follower of the Faith in Persia He wrote:

“In all the Divine Dispensations the eldest son hath been given extraordinary distinctions. Even the station of prophethood hath been his birthright.”

(Pay attention to the word distinction which has been used twice in the above quote. Remember this is the same creed that claims God has made absolutely no distinction between people and between male or female:

“The second principle is the Oneness of Humanity: all humans are divine sheep and God is the kind shepherd who has utter compassion towards all the sheep and has made no distinction [between them],”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb, vol. 3, p. 67.)

With the distinctions given to the eldest son, however, go concomitant duties. For example, he has the moral responsibility, for the sake of God, to care for his mother and also to consider the needs of the other heirs.

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, pp. 186-7

Now consider the case where the deceased only has female children.

Two thirds of the residence and personal clothing pass to the female offspring, and one third to the House of Justice, which God hath made to be the treasury of the people.

Why discriminate against the female offspring and give a third of their share to the UHJ, while if the same share was for the eldest son it would be solely for him to keep? Why can the eldest female offspring not inherit the house? Who has to fulfill the moral responsibilities?

If you are wondering if any belongings of the deceased are solely passed to the female offspring, the answer is yes. They get to keep their mother’s rags and old clothes:

In the case of the deceased mother all her used clothing is to be equally divided amongst her daughters.

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 165

If you are still wondering what happens to the mother’s unused and new clothes, well the girls do not get to keep them and they are divided between all the groups of aforementioned inheritors:

Her unworn clothing, jewels and property must be divided among her heirs.

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 187

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

 

 

Women and Inheritance Part 1

According to Baha’i law, a mother’s share from inheritance is smaller than a father’s and a sister’s share is smaller than a brother’s.

“The deceased’s property are split into 2520 portions. Out of these, 1080 are for the children, 390 for the wives, fathers 330, mothers 270, brothers 210, sisters 150, teachers 90”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 10, p. 117–119.

The oldest living son has complete rights to the residence of the deceased.

Bahā’u’llāh says in the Book of Aqdas:

“We have assigned the residence and personal clothing of the deceased to the male, not female, offspring, nor to the other heirs.”

It is further explained that:

He specifies that if there be more than one residence, the principal and most important one passes to the male offspring.

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 186.

Regarding this law `Abdu’l-Bahā states:

“The living residence belongs to the oldest living son, whether or not the deceased as any other wealth. The oldest living son also takes his share from the other belongings.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 10, p. 128.

Thus, if the deceased has left nothing behind but the home he lived in, it belongs to the oldest son and the other heirs have absolutely no share whatsoever!

The Discrimination doesn’t end here.

QUESTION: If the deceased hath not settled his obligation to Ḥuqūqu’llāh, nor paid his other debts, are these to be discharged by proportionate deductions from the residence, personal clothing and the rest of the estate, or are the residence and personal clothing set aside for the male offspring, and consequently the debts must be settled from the rest of the estate? And if the rest of the estate is insufficient for this purpose, how should the debts be settled?

ANSWER: Outstanding debts and payments of Ḥuqúq should be settled from the remainder of the estate, but if this is insufficient for the purpose, the shortfall should be met from his residence and personal clothing.

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, The Kitābi Aqdas, p. 130.

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

Equality Of Men And Women

“The tenth principle of his Highness Bahā’u’llāh is the unity of men and women; for in the view of God men and women are equal. They are all from the human race and the descendants of Adam. Because being male or female is not specific to the human race. Plants have male and female and animals too have male and female and there is no distinction. Look at the plant kingdom. Is there any distinction between male plants and female plants? Rather there is complete equality; and in the Animal kingdom too, there is no distinction at all. They are all under the shadow of God’s mercy.”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Khaṭābāt (Tehran), vol. 2, pp. 149–150.

Now let us analyze if this principle is followed by the Baha’is and what the leaders of Baha’i faith say about equality of man and women.

A woman’s question was referred to him (meaning `Abdu’l-Bahā) who had asked why hasn’t God made any woman Prophets and why have all Divine Manifestations been men. He answered:

“Although women and men share the same capacities and abilities, there is definitely no doubt that men are superior and stronger. Even in animals like pigeons, sparrows, peacocks, and other [birds] this advantage is visible.”

Reference: Maḥmūd Zaraqānī, Badā’i` al-āthār, vol. 1, p. 153.

Bahā’u’llāh says:

“Today, whoever amongst the slave-maids (meaning women) succeeds in recognizing He Who is the Goal of the World, will be considered a man in the Divine Book (dar kitāb ‘ilāhī az rijāl maḥsūb).”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 232.

Bahā’u’llāh says:

“Oh slave-maids! Rise for the true affair like men. Today, there are many women who God considers as men, and some men who are considered women.”

Why would someone utter these words if he believes men and women are equal? Man being considered as woman! Woman being considered as man!

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 232.

`Abdu’l-Bahā Says:

“Oh dear divine slave-maids! Do not pay attention to your [lack of] capacities and competencies. Rather, rely on the grace and kindness of the Blessed Beauty, because that everlasting beneficence will turn a shrub into a blessed tree, will turn a mirage into cool water, will turn a lost speck into the essence of existence, will turn a perishing ant into a tutor of the school of knowledge.”

In other words: Oh dear women, do not be sad that you are incompetent and incapable; my father can make up for these deficiencies for he can turn the lowliest things into the most exalted creatures.

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Makātīb, vol. 7, pp. 135–6.

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

Baha’u’llah Sexually Fondles With The Holy Spirit

What most Baha’is don’t know is that their prophet had a bad habit of sexually fondling with the Holy Spirit when She appeared to him. We will show three instances.

Instance 1:-

“We were standing on the Throne when that radiant leaf entered wearing a long white gown and became like the shining full moon in the horizons of the sky. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! When she removed her face-veil the skies and earth glittered as if the essence of the Ancient One had shone on her with all its lights. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! She was smiling and bending like a Moringa branch (Moringa branch or ghusn al-Bān is used to refer to a slender woman.) in the gaze of the All Merciful. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! She then went and started encircling for no reason or intention, as if the blossoms of love were being pulled towards her face by the magnet of her luminous beauty. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! She would walk whilst splendor was at her service, and the Kingdom of Beauty would glorify her behind her, because of her exquisite beauty and charm and her statuesque figure. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! Then we saw her black hair spread along her white neck, as if night and day had embraced each other in that illuminated place and far destination. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! When we stared at her face we saw a spot hidden under the veil of oneness that was shining from the horizon of her forehead. As if that spot had separated the tablets of the Merciful’s Kindness in (the world) of existence from the books of the lovers in the horizons. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! And that spot gestured to another spot that was above her right breast. Exalted is the Possessor of secret and evident things that has created her, no eye has seen anything like her! The Body of God rose and started walking and she started walking behind Him whilst she was listening to and was shaking and being pulled towards the verses of God. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! Then her happiness, joy, and yearning increased to an extent that she fainted. When she regained consciousness she came close and said, may my soul be sacrificed for your prison oh unseen mystery in the Kingdom of Creation. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! She continuously stared at the east of the Throne like someone who is drunk and bewildered until she wrapped her arm around her lord’s neck and she pulled him towards her. As she came nearer closer we too inched closer and found in her what has been revealed in the Hidden Red Book from the Most High Pen. She then tilted her head and placed her face on her fingers like a crescent changing into full moon. Exalted is her Creator, no eye has seen anything like her! She then screamed and said; “May every being be sacrificed on account of your calamities, O you Lord of the earth and sky . . .”

This encounter ended with hugging each other.

Reference:- Bahaullah, Athar-i-Qalam-i-Ala, Vol:2, No. 11, P. 171-172.
Instance 2:-

Bahā’u’llāh narrates another fantasy which is a little more extreme. He tells her to appear in whatever form she wants, then to dress, then to remove her veil, and finally hang her curly hair around her breasts:
“Oh you Pen, inform the Maiden of Paradise. Say by the True God, today is your day. Appear in whatever form you want then wear the brocade of Names and the white silk dress however you want. Then come out of the room of eternality like a rising sun from the forehead of Bahā. Then descend from the Most High Den and stop between the earth and the sky then remove the veil from your white face so that you may rip the great veils from these [people?] and they may gaze at the Great Beauty of God the Holy, the Honored, the Beloved. O Maiden of Bahā . . . hang around both your breasts your fragrant curls so that you may bestow on the worlds the breeze of your Merciful Lord.”

Reference: Bahaullah, Athar-i-Qalam-i-Ala, Vol:2, No. 89, P. 575-576.

Instance 3:

In the next encounter Bahā’u’llāh finally succeeds in attaining what he had yearned for:

“She then descended, drew near, and came forward until she stood before me. I was bewildered at the delicacy of her creation and her exquisite behavior. I found in myself a perplexity due to my yearning for her and an attraction due to my love for her. I rose my hand to her and removed the bottom of her veil from her shoulder and found her hair to be spread in wavy curls on her back and hanging down to near her legs in ringlets . . . once I saw her as the fire that had kindled in the Divine Tree . . . she then came forward until she stood opposite my face and spoke with a tone like the tone of a dove . . . when I paid attention with all my being I heard the mention of God the Most Exalted the Abhā in her tunes and the name of God the Most Exalted the Most High in her chants. It was then that I became attracted, perplexed, and hazed from her exquisite voice so I raised my hand once more and bared a breast from her breasts that were hidden behind her dress . . .

Reference:- Bahā’u’llāh, Āthār-i Qalam-i A`lā (Tehran: Mu’assisiyi Millī Maṭbū`āt Amrī, 125 B..[ Reprinted, H-Bahai: East Lansing, Mi., 2000]), vol. 4, pp. 383–384.