Contradictions Part 3

Bahā’u’llāh:
“Contradiction has and will not ever have a way in the sanctified realm of the Divine Manifestations.”

Bahā’u’llāh, Badī`, p. 126.

Q1. Are Aggression and Abuse Forbidden?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: All kinds of aggression and quarreling are prohibited.

“Using the sword has been completely abrogated and invasion has been completely prohibited. Even quarreling with other nations is not permissible,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 36, p. 272.

Bahā’u’llāh’s sister: Bahā’u’llāh and his followers ruthlessly murdered many people in Iraq.

Reference: `Izziye Khānum (Khānum Buzurg), Tanbīh al-nā’imīn, pp. 11–12.

 

Q2. Universal Peace or Tormenting Bahā’u’llāh’s Enemies?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: “Our wish is the Oneness of Humanity and our goal is universal peace.”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Payām-i malakūt, p. 52.

Bahā’u’llāh: “Be like a flame of fire to my enemies and a river of eternal life to my friends”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Ad`iyyih-i ḥaḍrat-i maḥbūb, p. 184; The same quote can be found on p.196 on the typed version at: reference.bahai.org

“And you, oh friends of God, be clouds of grace for those who believe in God and his signs, and be certain torment for those who do not believe in God and are polytheists (deniers of Baha’ism).”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Majmū`iy-i alwāḥ-i mubārak-ih, p. 216.

“God has made him (Bahā’u’llāh) a light for the monotheists (Baha’is) and a fire for the polytheists (non-Baha’is).”

Reference: Bahā’u’llāh, Āthār-i Qalam-i A`lā, vol. 2, no. 74, p. 372.

 

Q3. Should We Defend Ourselves If We Are Attacked?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: If someone attacks or wants to kill you don’t defend yourself!

“If someone abuses me, shows me injustice and oppresses me, and wounds the place of my liver, I will never show aggression,”

Reference: `Abdu’l-Bahā, Mufāwaḍāt, p. 189.

Shoghi: Baha’is are perfectly justified in defending their lives!

Reference: Helen Bassett Hornby, Lights of Guidance: A Bahā’ī Reference File, no. 398.

Bahā’u’llāh: No self-defense is allowed with weapons!

“As a religious body, Baha’i’s have, at the express command of Bahā’u’llāh, entirely abandoned the use of armed force in their own interests, even for strictly defensive purposes. In Persia, many many thousands of the Bābīs and Baha’is have suffered cruel deaths because of their faith. In the early days of the Cause, the Bābīs on various occasions defended themselves and their families by the sword with great courage and bravery. Bahā’u’llāh, however, forbade this . . .”

Reference: J. E. Esslemont, Bahā’u’llāh and the New Era, pp.169–170.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Self-defense is allowed when a savage tribe attacks with the intention of killing everybody!

“It may happen that at a given time warlike and savage tribes may furiously attack the body politic with the intention of carrying on a wholesale slaughter of its members; under such a circumstance defense is necessary,”

Reference: J. E. Esslemont, Bahā’u’llāh and the New Era, p. 171–172.

 

Q4. Weapons and Wars Are Prohibited or Not?

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Wars are prohibited in the Baha’i creed.

“In the [book of] Bayān, the order was [given] to invade other religions. But the book of Aqdas abrogated these orders, because using the sword has been completely abrogated and invasion has been completely prohibited,”

Reference: `Abd al-Ḥamīd Ishrāq Khāwarī, Ganjīniy-i ḥudūd wa aḥkām, chap. 36, p. 272.

`Abdu’l-Bahā: Sometimes to reach peace one must use war.

“A conquest can be a praiseworthy thing, and there are times when war becomes the powerful basis of peace, and ruin the very means of reconstruction. If, for example, a high-minded sovereign marshals his troops to block the onset of the insurgent and the aggressor, or again, if he takes the field and distinguishes himself in a struggle to unify a divided state and people, if, in brief, he is waging war for a righteous purpose, then this seeming wrath is mercy itself, and this apparent tyranny the very substance of justice and this warfare the cornerstone of peace,”

Reference: J. E. Esslemont, Bahā’u’llāh and the New Era, p. 172.

 

Courtesy: Twelve Principles – A Comprehensive Investigation on the Bahai Teachings

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